Kris Kristofferson, Cannes Film Festival, 1973, promoting Sam Peckinpah’s Pat Garrett & Billy the Kid.
(via The Selvedge Yard)

Kris Kristofferson, Cannes Film Festival, 1973, promoting Sam Peckinpah’s Pat Garrett & Billy the Kid.

(via The Selvedge Yard)

Watching Warren Oates’ white suit get increasingly more dirty & foul throughout this hungover two-hour revelation is one of the most trying-yet-truly-revelatory passages of Peckinpah’s demanding career. I watch it every few years and have not found it any easier to get through over time. Roger Ebert astutely pointed out, “I think I can feel Sam Peckinpah’s heart beating and head pounding in every frame in Bring Me the Head of Alfredo Garcia (1974), a film he made during a period of alcoholic fear and trembling.”

Watching Warren Oates’ white suit get increasingly more dirty & foul throughout this hungover two-hour revelation is one of the most trying-yet-truly-revelatory passages of Peckinpah’s demanding career. I watch it every few years and have not found it any easier to get through over time. Roger Ebert astutely pointed out, “I think I can feel Sam Peckinpah’s heart beating and head pounding in every frame in Bring Me the Head of Alfredo Garcia (1974), a film he made during a period of alcoholic fear and trembling.”

 
I think I can feel Sam Peckinpah’s heart beating and head pounding in every frame in Bring Me the Head of Alfredo Garcia (1974), a film he made during a period of alcoholic fear and trembling. I believe its hero, Bennie, completes his task with the same dogged courage as Peckinpah used to complete the movie, and that Bennie’s exhaustion, disgust and despair at the end might mirror Peckinpah’s own. I sense that the emotional weather on the set seeped onto the screen, haunting it with a buried level of passion. If there is anything to the auteur theory, then Alfredo Garcia is the most autobiographical film Peckinpah ever made.
— Roger Ebert on Bring Me the Head of Alfredo Garcia (1974), directed by Sam Peckinpah, pictured above with Warren Oates on the set of the film

I think I can feel Sam Peckinpah’s heart beating and head pounding in every frame in Bring Me the Head of Alfredo Garcia (1974), a film he made during a period of alcoholic fear and trembling. I believe its hero, Bennie, completes his task with the same dogged courage as Peckinpah used to complete the movie, and that Bennie’s exhaustion, disgust and despair at the end might mirror Peckinpah’s own. I sense that the emotional weather on the set seeped onto the screen, haunting it with a buried level of passion. If there is anything to the auteur theory, then Alfredo Garcia is the most autobiographical film Peckinpah ever made.

Roger Ebert on Bring Me the Head of Alfredo Garcia (1974), directed by Sam Peckinpah, pictured above with Warren Oates on the set of the film

…perhaps most important to Peckinpah as a man and as a filmmaker—it’s about how people have to adapt to change, or change will brutally cut them down and leave them behind.
— Leonard Pierce, in his piece on Sam Peckinpah for The A.V. Club
(via somehillbilly)

…perhaps most important to Peckinpah as a man and as a filmmaker—it’s about how people have to adapt to change, or change will brutally cut them down and leave them behind.

— Leonard Pierce, in his piece on Sam Peckinpah for The A.V. Club

(via somehillbilly)

“The Price Is Right can really get me going.”— Sam Peckinpah
Just found this audio interview between the late, great filmmaker and Tony Macklin.

The Price Is Right can really get me going.
— Sam Peckinpah

Just found this audio interview between the late, great filmmaker and Tony Macklin.