There is nobody in this country who got rich on his own. Nobody. You  built a factory out there? Good for you. 
But I want to be  clear: you moved your goods to market on the roads the rest of us paid  for; you hired workers the rest of us paid to educate; you were safe in  your factory because of police forces and fire forces that the rest of  us paid for. You didn’t have to worry that marauding bands would come  and seize everything at your factory, and hire someone to protect  against this, because of the work the rest of us did.
Now look, you built a factory and it turned into something terrific, or a  great idea? God bless. Keep a big hunk of it. But part of the  underlying social contract is you take a hunk of that and pay forward  for the next kid who comes along.
— Elizabeth Warren, Massachusetts Senatorial candidate
(via CBS; and yungjun)

There is nobody in this country who got rich on his own. Nobody. You built a factory out there? Good for you.

But I want to be clear: you moved your goods to market on the roads the rest of us paid for; you hired workers the rest of us paid to educate; you were safe in your factory because of police forces and fire forces that the rest of us paid for. You didn’t have to worry that marauding bands would come and seize everything at your factory, and hire someone to protect against this, because of the work the rest of us did.

Now look, you built a factory and it turned into something terrific, or a great idea? God bless. Keep a big hunk of it. But part of the underlying social contract is you take a hunk of that and pay forward for the next kid who comes along.

— Elizabeth Warren, Massachusetts Senatorial candidate

(via CBS; and yungjun)

Tags: Politics

Suppose the people around here decide that instead of having more consumer goods they’d like to have more leisure. The market system doesn’t allow you that choice. It drives you to having more consumer goods because it’s all driven to maximizing production. But is the only human value to have more and more goods you don’t need? In fact the business world knows that it’s not. That’s why they spend billions of dollars in advertising, to try to create artificial wants.
— Noam Chomsky
(via congressman)

Suppose the people around here decide that instead of having more consumer goods they’d like to have more leisure. The market system doesn’t allow you that choice. It drives you to having more consumer goods because it’s all driven to maximizing production. But is the only human value to have more and more goods you don’t need? In fact the business world knows that it’s not. That’s why they spend billions of dollars in advertising, to try to create artificial wants.

— Noam Chomsky

(via congressman)

Tags: Politics

One of the most inspiring moments of the year so far came in Feb in the form of Rep. Jackie Speier’s impromptu speech in support of Planned Parenthood. ThinkProgress' report below:

Since gaining the upper-hand in the House, Republicans have led what Rep. Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) called “the most comprehensive and radical assault on women’s health in our lifetime.” Blindly constructing bills to redefine rape, to leave women to die rather than perform an abortion, and to cut off support for women’s health care clinics, the House GOP has beat the anti-choice drum while woefully ignorant of how such sanctimony affects women in the real world.
Yesterday, Rep. Jackie Speier (D-CA) shattered that bubble on the House floor as the debate to defund Planned Parenthood neared its third hour. Speier planned to speak on a different topic but when Rep. Chris Smith (R-NJ) read a lengthy account of an abortion procedure in graphic and gruesome detail and described it as “child abuse,” Speier confronted his “preposterous” ignorance with an intimate revelation — she had to have an abortion:

SPEIER: You know I had really planned to speak about something else. But the gentleman from New Jersey just put my stomach in knots. Because I am one of those woman he spoke about just now. I had a procedure at 17 weeks, pregnant with a child that had moved from the vagina into the cervix. And that procedure that you just talked about is a procedure I endured. I lost a baby. But for you to stand on this floor and suggest as you have that somehow this is a procedure that is either welcomed or done cavalierly or done without any thought is preposterous. To think that we are here tonight debating this issue, while the American people, if they are listening, are scratching their heads and wondering “what does this have to do with me getting a job? What does this have to do with reducing the deficit?” The answer is nothing at all.

One of the most inspiring moments of the year so far came in Feb in the form of Rep. Jackie Speier’s impromptu speech in support of Planned Parenthood. ThinkProgress' report below:

Since gaining the upper-hand in the House, Republicans have led what Rep. Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) called “the most comprehensive and radical assault on women’s health in our lifetime.” Blindly constructing bills to redefine rape, to leave women to die rather than perform an abortion, and to cut off support for women’s health care clinics, the House GOP has beat the anti-choice drum while woefully ignorant of how such sanctimony affects women in the real world.

Yesterday, Rep. Jackie Speier (D-CA) shattered that bubble on the House floor as the debate to defund Planned Parenthood neared its third hour. Speier planned to speak on a different topic but when Rep. Chris Smith (R-NJ) read a lengthy account of an abortion procedure in graphic and gruesome detail and described it as “child abuse,” Speier confronted his “preposterous” ignorance with an intimate revelation — she had to have an abortion:

SPEIER: You know I had really planned to speak about something else. But the gentleman from New Jersey just put my stomach in knots. Because I am one of those woman he spoke about just now. I had a procedure at 17 weeks, pregnant with a child that had moved from the vagina into the cervix. And that procedure that you just talked about is a procedure I endured. I lost a baby. But for you to stand on this floor and suggest as you have that somehow this is a procedure that is either welcomed or done cavalierly or done without any thought is preposterous. To think that we are here tonight debating this issue, while the American people, if they are listening, are scratching their heads and wondering “what does this have to do with me getting a job? What does this have to do with reducing the deficit?” The answer is nothing at all.

Tags: Politics

Teddy Roosevelt’s diary entry for February 14th, 1884 - the day his wife Alice died from Bright’s disease.  He was 25 and she was 22.


(via marathonpacks)

Teddy Roosevelt’s diary entry for February 14th, 1884 - the day his wife Alice died from Bright’s disease.  He was 25 and she was 22.

(via marathonpacks)

(Source: fckypym)

Tags: Obit Politics

“I never said he was (taking ibogaine), I said there was a rumor in Milwaukeee that he was. Which was true, and I started the rumor in Milwaukee. If you read that carefully, I’m a very accurate journalist.”
— Hunter S. Thompson, referring to Edmund Muskie’s constant and uncontrolled use of Ibogaine 
Photo: Self Portrait, After Beating by Hell’s Angels, circa 1960sfrom Chasing Light piece on Annie Liebovitz & HST 
(via zenthing)

“I never said he was (taking ibogaine), I said there was a rumor in Milwaukeee that he was. Which was true, and I started the rumor in Milwaukee. If you read that carefully, I’m a very accurate journalist.”

— Hunter S. Thompson, referring to Edmund Muskie’s constant and uncontrolled use of Ibogaine 

Photo: Self Portrait, After Beating by Hell’s Angels, circa 1960s
from Chasing Light piece on Annie Liebovitz & HST 

(via zenthing)

Tags: JFK Politics

Emotionally, they were in many ways the two most isolated, most alone people I ever met. They both wanted desperately to connect, but hadn’t the faintest idea how. That’s what made their love story so achingly poignant. And it was, in every sense of the word, a love story.
—Chuck Spalding on JFK and Jackie O.
(via notarobotbutaghost)

Emotionally, they were in many ways the two most isolated, most alone people I ever met. They both wanted desperately to connect, but hadn’t the faintest idea how. That’s what made their love story so achingly poignant. And it was, in every sense of the word, a love story.

Chuck Spalding on JFK and Jackie O.

(via notarobotbutaghost)

Bros.
(via aquariumdrunkard)

Bros.

(via aquariumdrunkard)

Johnny Cash & Richard Nixon, 1972.

Johnny Cash & Richard Nixon, 1972.

JFK’s look here has a very Mike Manning-like quality to it.
(via notarobotbutaghost : yralgebra: enthusiasmdocumented)

JFK’s look here has a very Mike Manning-like quality to it.

(via notarobotbutaghost : yralgebraenthusiasmdocumented)

“If a bullet should enter my brain, let that bullet destroy every closet door.”— Harvey Milk

Photo taken at San Francisco’s Gay Freedom Day parade in 1978.
(via fernsandmoss)

“If a bullet should enter my brain, let that bullet destroy every closet door.”
— Harvey Milk

Photo taken at San Francisco’s Gay Freedom Day parade in 1978.

(via fernsandmoss)

Tags: Politics

Nelson Mandela’s generosity

I’m feeling a little inspired watching Clint Eastwood’s Invictus at the moment. Not soooo inspired that I can’t take my eyes off the film — especially during its by-the-books rugby battle scenes (and I’m usually a sucker for a good sports narrative in film). Moreso, I was so moved early on in the film by Nelson Mandela’s political compassion that, in its light, what would otherwise be perfectly engaging sports scenes are feeling a little underwhelming. The real sport story of Invictus isn’t found on the field but between the newly-freed and elected Mandela and his hungry-for-change supporters, from whom he found himself alienated when he saw a nation-building opportunity in the shape of supporting the national rugby team. Rather than use his new mandate to dismantle what was seen by black South Africans as a symbol of antiquated and still painful Apartheid-era white hegemony, he chose instead to risk his hard won political capital to support the white Afrikaner-cherished tradition. In a very moving scene, Mandela (played deftly by the always great Morgan Freeman) gives the following speech to his party, who’d gathered to vote on shutting down the rugby program.

"On Robben Island in Pollsmoor Prison, all of my jailers were Afrikaners. For 27 years I studied them. I learned their language. Read their books. Their poetry. I had to know my enemy before I could prevail against them. And we did prevail, did we not? All of us here, we prevailed. Our enemy is no longer the Afrikaner. They are our fellow South Africans, our partners in a democracy. And they treasure Springbok rugby. If we take that away, we lose them. We prove that we are what they feared we would be. We have to be better than that. We have to surprise them with the compassion, with restraint and generosity. I know all of the things they denied us. But this is no time to celebrate petty revenge. This is the time to build our nation using every single brick available to us. Even if that brick comes wrapped in green and gold."

While it didn’t make much green at the box office (making a disappointing $37.5 million in theaters), that’s surely the stuff of biopic gold (you can practically hear the producers clinking their champagne glasses in the background during the pregnant pause after that speech is delivered) and the stuff Eastwood was born to deliver in a blaze of John Huston-esque glory. Is it safe? You bet. Has it been done before? You bet. Does it have guts? Well, the story does, but not so sure about the storytelling. Does it matter? No way. Sometimes you just feel like a Snickers, and this shit is inspiring. At the very least I’m feeling compelled to do some reading on Mandela to go beyond my anecdotal understanding of who he was as a man.