The one of a kind Paul Williams as seen in Phantom of the Paradise (1974, dir Brian DePalma), for which he also wrote the (killer) soundtrack. He did the same for the Bugsy Malone (1976, dir. Alan Parker), one of the weirdest kids films of the ’70s. Watch the trailer.

The one of a kind Paul Williams as seen in Phantom of the Paradise (1974, dir Brian DePalma), for which he also wrote the (killer) soundtrack. He did the same for the Bugsy Malone (1976, dir. Alan Parker), one of the weirdest kids films of the ’70s. Watch the trailer.

Session player to the stars, Nicky Hopkins’ second album The Tin Man Was A Dreamer (1973) is an understated gem. It’s piano-driven songwriterly pop that oscillates between Paul Williams-type tunes like "Waiting for the Band" and a harder rockin’ Apple Records power pop instrumentals like "Edward".
Suck on his iso’d piano track on The Stones’ "Love In Vain" and "Angie".
(image via billboardingparty)

Session player to the stars, Nicky Hopkins’ second album The Tin Man Was A Dreamer (1973) is an understated gem. It’s piano-driven songwriterly pop that oscillates between Paul Williams-type tunes like "Waiting for the Band" and a harder rockin’ Apple Records power pop instrumentals like "Edward".

Suck on his iso’d piano track on The Stones’ "Love In Vain" and "Angie".

(image via billboardingparty)

Before he teamed with producer Richard Perry in the late ’70s — going disco (along with the rest of the Western world) with that incredible falsetto and mastering the art of the power ballad — Leo Sayer was a wayward pop singer-songwriter of the bold yet slightly weird variety. His second album Just A Boy (seen here in this June 22, 1974 Billboard ad) is one of those LPs I buy everytime I see it in the dollar bins, just to give away to an unsuspecting friend for conversion’s sake. Reminiscent of early Elton John, the album is maybe best understood as it was meant to be heard — you start with that first track "Telepath". Wow. Where is he going with this? Biff Rose and Paul Williams fans gather round, this is some free shit. Constraint free. Freddie Mercury free.
The album ends with the slightly more of-the-time (but no less incredible) pop tune "Giving It All Away" which he wrote for Roger Daltrey, who enjoyed his first solo hit the year before with it.
Cheggit!
(image via billboardingparty)

Before he teamed with producer Richard Perry in the late ’70s — going disco (along with the rest of the Western world) with that incredible falsetto and mastering the art of the power ballad — Leo Sayer was a wayward pop singer-songwriter of the bold yet slightly weird variety. His second album Just A Boy (seen here in this June 22, 1974 Billboard ad) is one of those LPs I buy everytime I see it in the dollar bins, just to give away to an unsuspecting friend for conversion’s sake. Reminiscent of early Elton John, the album is maybe best understood as it was meant to be heard — you start with that first track "Telepath". Wow. Where is he going with this? Biff Rose and Paul Williams fans gather round, this is some free shit. Constraint free. Freddie Mercury free.

The album ends with the slightly more of-the-time (but no less incredible) pop tune "Giving It All Away" which he wrote for Roger Daltrey, who enjoyed his first solo hit the year before with it.

Cheggit!

(image via billboardingparty)