am all fucked out. That goddamn woman has absolutely screwed me from  one end of the room to the other for three goddam nights. I went back to  the Ambassador this morning, and I said, “You know it’s a great  assignment, but I just can’t go on.” And the Ambassador said, “Roald,  did you ever see the Charles Laughton movie of Henry VIII?” And I said  “Yes.” “Well,” he said, “do you remember the scene with Henry going into  the bedroom with Anne of Cleves, and he turns and says ‘The things I’ve  done for England’? Well, that’s what you’ve got to do.
— Roald Dahl
(via fatherfigurine)

am all fucked out. That goddamn woman has absolutely screwed me from one end of the room to the other for three goddam nights. I went back to the Ambassador this morning, and I said, “You know it’s a great assignment, but I just can’t go on.” And the Ambassador said, “Roald, did you ever see the Charles Laughton movie of Henry VIII?” And I said “Yes.” “Well,” he said, “do you remember the scene with Henry going into the bedroom with Anne of Cleves, and he turns and says ‘The things I’ve done for England’? Well, that’s what you’ve got to do.

Roald Dahl

(via fatherfigurine)



Keepers of private notebooks are a different breed altogether, lonely and resistant rearrangers of things, anxious malcontents, children afflicted apparently at birth with some presentiment of loss.
— Joan Didion, “On Keeping a Notebook”
(text via libraryland)

Keepers of private notebooks are a different breed altogether, lonely and resistant rearrangers of things, anxious malcontents, children afflicted apparently at birth with some presentiment of loss.

— Joan Didion, “On Keeping a Notebook”

(text via libraryland)

Note by Hunter S. Thompson to Graham McKeen’s father.
(via fatherfigurine)

Note by Hunter S. Thompson to Graham McKeen’s father.

(via fatherfigurine)

My loathings are simple: stupidity, oppression, crime, cruelty, soft music. My pleasures are the most intense known to man: writing and butterfly hunting.

— Vladimir Nabokov

Photo by Philippe Halsman, 1966.
(via anneyhall)

My loathings are simple: stupidity, oppression, crime, cruelty, soft music. My pleasures are the most intense known to man: writing and butterfly hunting.

— Vladimir Nabokov

Photo by Philippe Halsman, 1966.

(via anneyhall)

Tags: Literature

"The truth doesn’t have to do with cruelty, the truth has to do with mercy."
— Ken Kesey, featured in the new doc Magic Trip
(quote via libraryland)

"The truth doesn’t have to do with cruelty, the truth has to do with mercy."

— Ken Kesey, featured in the new doc Magic Trip

(quote via libraryland)

 
“There are two motives for reading a book; one, that you enjoy it; the other, that you can boast about it.”
— Bertrand Russell
(text via isomorphismes)

“There are two motives for reading a book; one, that you enjoy it; the other, that you can boast about it.”

— Bertrand Russell

(text via isomorphismes)

Tags: Literature

As I ate the oysters with their strong taste of the sea and their faint metallic taste that the cold white wine washed away, leaving only the sea taste and the succulent texture, and as I drank their cold liquid from each shell and washed it down with the crisp taste of the wine, I lost the empty feeling and began to be happy and to make plans…
- Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast
Pictured above holding court in Finca Vigia, Cuba, 1959 
(image via aconversationoncool; text via notarobotbutaghost)

As I ate the oysters with their strong taste of the sea and their faint metallic taste that the cold white wine washed away, leaving only the sea taste and the succulent texture, and as I drank their cold liquid from each shell and washed it down with the crisp taste of the wine, I lost the empty feeling and began to be happy and to make plans…

- Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast

Pictured above holding court in Finca Vigia, Cuba, 1959 

(image via aconversationoncool; text via notarobotbutaghost)

“I am the literary equivalent of a Big Mac and fries.”
— Stephen King
(text via libraryland)

“I am the literary equivalent of a Big Mac and fries.”

— Stephen King

(text via libraryland)

"An easy life, an easy love, an easy death—these were not for me.”
— Hermann Hesse
(text via congressman)

"An easy life, an easy love, an easy death—these were not for me.”

— Hermann Hesse

(text via congressman)

Stories are for those late hours in the night when you can’t remember how you got from where you were to where you are. Stories are for eternity, when memory is erased, when there is nothing to remember but the story.
— Tim O’Brien, The Things They Carried
(text via libraryland)

Stories are for those late hours in the night when you can’t remember how you got from where you were to where you are. Stories are for eternity, when memory is erased, when there is nothing to remember but the story.

— Tim O’Brien, The Things They Carried

(text via libraryland)

Tags: Literature

"I am against revolutions because they always involve a return to the status quo."
— Henry Miller
(via nevver)

"I am against revolutions because they always involve a return to the status quo."

— Henry Miller

(via nevver)

Chuck Berry can’t even mend you up. You doin’ a pantomime in the eye of a hurricane. Ain’t even got the sense to signal for help. You lost the barrelhouse, you lost the honkey-tonk. You lost your feelings in a suburban country club the first time they ask you to play “Risin’ River Blues” for the debutante ball. You ripped your own self off and now all you got is yo’ poison to call yo’ gift. You a punk chump with a sequin nose and you’ll need more’n a Les Paul Gibson to bring you home.
— Sam Shepard, The Tooth of Crime
Sam Shepard and Patti Smith photo by Gerard Malanga

Chuck Berry can’t even mend you up. You doin’ a pantomime in the eye of a hurricane. Ain’t even got the sense to signal for help. You lost the barrelhouse, you lost the honkey-tonk. You lost your feelings in a suburban country club the first time they ask you to play “Risin’ River Blues” for the debutante ball. You ripped your own self off and now all you got is yo’ poison to call yo’ gift. You a punk chump with a sequin nose and you’ll need more’n a Les Paul Gibson to bring you home.

— Sam Shepard, The Tooth of Crime

Sam Shepard and Patti Smith photo by Gerard Malanga

(Source: aquavelva, via underthechinaberrytree)

I never asked Tolstoy to write for me, a little colored girl in Lorain, Ohio. I never asked [James] Joyce not to mention Catholicism or the world of Dublin. Never. And I don’t know why I should be asked to explain your life to you. We have splendid writers to do that, but I am not one of them. It is that business of being universal, a word hopelessly stripped of meaning for me. Faulkner wrote what I suppose could be called regional literature and had it published all over the world. That’s what I wish to do. If I tried to write a universal novel, it would be water. Behind this question is the suggestion that to write for black people is somehow to diminish the writing. From my perspective there are only black people. When I say ‘people,’ that’s what I mean.
— Toni Morrison
(text via libraryland)

I never asked Tolstoy to write for me, a little colored girl in Lorain, Ohio. I never asked [James] Joyce not to mention Catholicism or the world of Dublin. Never. And I don’t know why I should be asked to explain your life to you. We have splendid writers to do that, but I am not one of them. It is that business of being universal, a word hopelessly stripped of meaning for me. Faulkner wrote what I suppose could be called regional literature and had it published all over the world. That’s what I wish to do. If I tried to write a universal novel, it would be water. Behind this question is the suggestion that to write for black people is somehow to diminish the writing. From my perspective there are only black people. When I say ‘people,’ that’s what I mean.

— Toni Morrison

(text via libraryland)

In the late 1970s-early 1980s, [Stephen] King published a handful of short novels … under the pseudonym Richard Bachman. The idea behind this was largely an experiment to measure for himself whether or not he could replicate his own success again, and allay at least part of the notion within his mind that popularity might all be just an accident of fate.
— From Wiki entry on Stephen King, shown above in 1982 outside of his house in Bangor, Maine.
(photo via bigmagnets:pocketfullofdeadlyposiez)

In the late 1970s-early 1980s, [Stephen] King published a handful of short novels … under the pseudonym Richard Bachman. The idea behind this was largely an experiment to measure for himself whether or not he could replicate his own success again, and allay at least part of the notion within his mind that popularity might all be just an accident of fate.

— From Wiki entry on Stephen King, shown above in 1982 outside of his house in Bangor, Maine.

(photo via bigmagnets:pocketfullofdeadlyposiez)

(via notarobotbutaghost)