If our culture’s fixation on female fatness or thinness were about sex, it would be a private issue between a woman and her lover; if it were about health, between a woman and herself.
— Naomi Wolf, The Beauty Myth

(text via bigmagnets)

If our culture’s fixation on female fatness or thinness were about sex, it would be a private issue between a woman and her lover; if it were about health, between a woman and herself.

— Naomi Wolf, The Beauty Myth

(text via bigmagnets)

Loved this very inspiring Harper’s Bazaar piece by fellow former-Fargoan Jennifer Baumgardner, about how, after being in love with a woman for years, she settled down with a man — and why gender doesn’t matter.

Loved this very inspiring Harper’s Bazaar piece by fellow former-Fargoan Jennifer Baumgardner, about how, after being in love with a woman for years, she settled down with a man — and why gender doesn’t matter.

Tags: Gender Fargo

 
Because Bergman is a man who loves women without identifying with them, his film is full of the sort of wonder and speculation experienced by a tourist in a strange land that he knows well, but that will never be his own.
— Vincent Canby in his Dec. 22, 1972 review for the New York Times

Because Bergman is a man who loves women without identifying with them, his film is full of the sort of wonder and speculation experienced by a tourist in a strange land that he knows well, but that will never be his own.

— Vincent Canby in his Dec. 22, 1972 review for the New York Times

Jonathan Richman is a one of a kind. I recently revisited his country dip Jonathan Goes Country (1990) and it holds up, especially "Since She Started to Ride".

Jonathan Richman is a one of a kind. I recently revisited his country dip Jonathan Goes Country (1990) and it holds up, especially "Since She Started to Ride".

(Source: annlf, via koolthings-deactivated20120418)

“A woman unsatisfied must have luxuries. But a woman who loves a man would sleep on a board.” 
—D.H. Lawrence
Photographed above with his wife Frieda in Mexico, 1923, by Witter Bynner.
(via anneyhall)

“A woman unsatisfied must have luxuries. But a woman who loves a man would sleep on a board.” 

—D.H. Lawrence

Photographed above with his wife Frieda in Mexico, 1923, by Witter Bynner.

(via anneyhall)

“If there’s specific resistance to women making movies, I just choose to ignore that as an obstacle for two reasons: I can’t change my gender, and I refuse to stop making movies.”
— Kathryn Bigelow, Oscar-winning director of Hurt Locker (2008) and one of my favorite vampire films Near Dark (1987) 
(via bigmagnets)

If there’s specific resistance to women making movies, I just choose to ignore that as an obstacle for two reasons: I can’t change my gender, and I refuse to stop making movies.

— Kathryn Bigelow, Oscar-winning director of Hurt Locker (2008) and one of my favorite vampire films Near Dark (1987)

(via bigmagnets)

Tags: Film Gender Oscar

secretshorts:


 
This is wonderfulmy own personal experience has been that the single most self-esteem-increasing thing you can do for yourself is to give yourself permission to be ugly.  we should teach girls that they can look like hell and still be worthy of love - worthy of writing novels, having great sex, running the business, whatever amazing thing they can do while still not being a symmetrical tan white skinny bikini beach babe.
ugly people are great.  ugly people are iconoclasts.  ugly people do their thing and are not beautiful and do not apologize for it.  frida kahlo made a life out of painting her disability & chronic pain, her depression, and her moustache & unibrow.  these things are good and human.  if we chalk over them and pretend that we are beautiful, when culturally defined beauty is a privileged commodity, we are erasing our strengths.

secretshorts:

This is wonderful

my own personal experience has been that the single most self-esteem-increasing thing you can do for yourself is to give yourself permission to be ugly.  we should teach girls that they can look like hell and still be worthy of love - worthy of writing novels, having great sex, running the business, whatever amazing thing they can do while still not being a symmetrical tan white skinny bikini beach babe.

ugly people are great.  ugly people are iconoclasts.  ugly people do their thing and are not beautiful and do not apologize for it.  frida kahlo made a life out of painting her disability & chronic pain, her depression, and her moustache & unibrow.  these things are good and human.  if we chalk over them and pretend that we are beautiful, when culturally defined beauty is a privileged commodity, we are erasing our strengths.

Tags: Art Gender

It wasn’t at this particular Bikini Kill show in Fargo, but at an earlier one — on 9/21/99 at Exit 99 — that I had my most distinct personal experience with Kathleen Hanna. I was your average insecure high school sophomore finding himself in DIY rock and I’d ventured out to see my friend Heather’s favorite band. I was a fan as well and was very excited for the show. Made my way to the front of the crowd even. Which, at the time I lacked the wisdom to know, was not exactly kosher at a Bikini Kill show. The show gets going and is totally ruling. I’m feeling it. Uuuuntil one of Hanna’s pro-grrrl rants turned anti-boy. She singles wimpy little me out in the crowd with a “No BOY’S in the front row!” and a sneer, punctuating it by taking gum outta her mouth and throwing it at me.
Wow. Humiliating. I was paralyzed. Didn’t know what to do. So I just stood there. Inert. Next song starts. Spotlight slooowly dissipates and I fade into the crowd over the course of the song. Listened to the rest of the show in the back of the crowd, sitting against the wall feeling like a total goober.
I kinda resented Hanna for many years till recently. Dismissed her music as the by-product of a self-important grandstander. Which isn’t fair. Her art was political in nature and empowering to a lot of people, which is pretty cool. It’s just that my enjoyment of her work was tainted by a bad memory of being disempowered. It was watching her performative monologue describing her role in the origin of “Smells Like Teen Spirit” in 1990 recently that made me revisit her work and appreciate it from a more objective perspective again. A special, and oft-overlooked, one is her Julie Ruin album. What a record.
(image via lunchyprices)

It wasn’t at this particular Bikini Kill show in Fargo, but at an earlier one — on 9/21/99 at Exit 99 — that I had my most distinct personal experience with Kathleen Hanna. I was your average insecure high school sophomore finding himself in DIY rock and I’d ventured out to see my friend Heather’s favorite band. I was a fan as well and was very excited for the show. Made my way to the front of the crowd even. Which, at the time I lacked the wisdom to know, was not exactly kosher at a Bikini Kill show. The show gets going and is totally ruling. I’m feeling it. Uuuuntil one of Hanna’s pro-grrrl rants turned anti-boy. She singles wimpy little me out in the crowd with a “No BOY’S in the front row!” and a sneer, punctuating it by taking gum outta her mouth and throwing it at me.

Wow. Humiliating. I was paralyzed. Didn’t know what to do. So I just stood there. Inert. Next song starts. Spotlight slooowly dissipates and I fade into the crowd over the course of the song. Listened to the rest of the show in the back of the crowd, sitting against the wall feeling like a total goober.

I kinda resented Hanna for many years till recently. Dismissed her music as the by-product of a self-important grandstander. Which isn’t fair. Her art was political in nature and empowering to a lot of people, which is pretty cool. It’s just that my enjoyment of her work was tainted by a bad memory of being disempowered. It was watching her performative monologue describing her role in the origin of “Smells Like Teen Spirit” in 1990 recently that made me revisit her work and appreciate it from a more objective perspective again. A special, and oft-overlooked, one is her Julie Ruin album. What a record.

(image via lunchyprices)

It’s one of my favorite Scorsese films. Here’s an O.G. review of the film by Roger Ebert from December 1, 1974, with this passage which I feel kinda nails it:
The movie has been both attacked and defended on feminist grounds, but I think it belongs somewhere outside ideology, maybe in the area of contemporary myth and romance. There are scenes in which we take Alice and her journey perfectly seriously, there are scenes of harrowing reality and then there are other scenes (including some hilarious passages in a restaurant where she waits on tables) where Scorsese edges into slight, cheerful exaggeration. There are times, indeed, when the movie seems less about Alice than it does about the speculations and daydreams of a lot of women about her age, who identify with the liberation of other women, but are unsure on the subject of themselves.
From Wikipedia:Ellen Burstyn won the Academy Award for Best Actress. Diane Ladd was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress but lost to Ingrid Bergman in Murder on the Orient Express, and Robert Getchell was nominated for the Academy Award For Best Original Screenplay but lost to Robert Towne for Chinatown.

It’s one of my favorite Scorsese films. Here’s an O.G. review of the film by Roger Ebert from December 1, 1974, with this passage which I feel kinda nails it:

The movie has been both attacked and defended on feminist grounds, but I think it belongs somewhere outside ideology, maybe in the area of contemporary myth and romance. There are scenes in which we take Alice and her journey perfectly seriously, there are scenes of harrowing reality and then there are other scenes (including some hilarious passages in a restaurant where she waits on tables) where Scorsese edges into slight, cheerful exaggeration. There are times, indeed, when the movie seems less about Alice than it does about the speculations and daydreams of a lot of women about her age, who identify with the liberation of other women, but are unsure on the subject of themselves.

From Wikipedia:
Ellen Burstyn won the Academy Award for Best Actress. Diane Ladd was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress but lost to Ingrid Bergman in Murder on the Orient Express, and Robert Getchell was nominated for the Academy Award For Best Original Screenplay but lost to Robert Towne for Chinatown.