"Mr. Cassavetes is unquestionably sympathetic to the rootless state of the middle-American housewife."
— Nora Sayre, in her Oct 14, 1974 review of A Woman Under the Influence for the New York Times

"Mr. Cassavetes is unquestionably sympathetic to the rootless state of the middle-American housewife."

— Nora Sayre, in her Oct 14, 1974 review of A Woman Under the Influence for the New York Times

…Love scores an altogether unreasonable triumph over common sense in Minnie and Moskowitz, the new comedy by John Cassavetes. The movie is sort of a fairy tale, Cassavetes says; it’s dedicated to all the people who didn’t marry the person they should have. It is a movie on the side of love, and it is one of the finest movies of the year.
— Roger Ebert, in his February 14, 1972 review of Minnie and Moskowitz (1972)

…Love scores an altogether unreasonable triumph over common sense in Minnie and Moskowitz, the new comedy by John Cassavetes. The movie is sort of a fairy tale, Cassavetes says; it’s dedicated to all the people who didn’t marry the person they should have. It is a movie on the side of love, and it is one of the finest movies of the year.

— Roger Ebert, in his February 14, 1972 review of Minnie and Moskowitz (1972)

There’s no other American director who can do what John Cassavetes does on the screen. There may not be many who would want to. Mr. Cassavetes’s work, in Love Streams, as in his earlier films, is as overflowing with emotional constructs as it is barren of other forms of thought. It’s excessive and idiosyncratic all the way. Yet Mr. Cassavetes, as both actor and director, is never without his own peculiar magnetism and authority. Once again, he is able to galvanize a long, rambling, quirky psychodrama through sheer force of personality. 
— Janet Maslin for New York Times, in her August 24, 1984 review of Cassavetes’ last great film

There’s no other American director who can do what John Cassavetes does on the screen. There may not be many who would want to. Mr. Cassavetes’s work, in Love Streams, as in his earlier films, is as overflowing with emotional constructs as it is barren of other forms of thought. It’s excessive and idiosyncratic all the way. Yet Mr. Cassavetes, as both actor and director, is never without his own peculiar magnetism and authority. Once again, he is able to galvanize a long, rambling, quirky psychodrama through sheer force of personality. 

— Janet Maslin for New York Times, in her August 24, 1984 review of Cassavetes’ last great film

Like a Time Machine Powered by Bicycles wrote a nice piece on this release of John Cassavetes’ Faces soundtrack.

Like a Time Machine Powered by Bicycles wrote a nice piece on this release of John Cassavetes’ Faces soundtrack.

John Cassavetes’ woman under the influence