A Haunting ‘Conversation’ (an excerpt)by Vincent Canby, 1974 
Have you considered the possibility that everything that’s ever been said in this world might still be echoing somewhere, maybe rattling around within the interior of a stone, a tree trunk or at the bottom of the sea?
Though becoming increasingly faint, the sounds shall never disappear entirely and one day, perhaps, there will be equipment Sensitive enough to retrieve and record mankind’s oral history. In 24 abridged volumes it would make a perfect introductory offer to a book club.
Or even a book club all of its own.

 A Haunting ‘Conversation’ (an excerpt)
by Vincent Canby, 1974 

Have you considered the possibility that
everything that’s ever been said in this world
might still be echoing somewhere,
maybe rattling around within
the interior of a stone, a tree trunk
or at the bottom of the sea?

Though becoming increasingly faint,
the sounds shall never disappear
entirely and one day, perhaps,
there will be equipment Sensitive enough
to retrieve and record mankind’s oral history.
In 24 abridged volumes it would make
a perfect introductory offer to a book club.

Or even a book club all of its own.

(via hannahfidell)

Wim Wenders, ”The Coppolas”

Wim Wenders, ”The Coppolas”

Mickey Rourke as Motorcycle Boy, from Francis Ford Coppola’s 1983 adaptation of S.E. Hinton’s Rumble Fish.
Of the film, Janet Maslin had the following to say in her October 7, 1983 review for The New York Times:
 
Adapting another of S. E. Hinton’s novels, Mr. Coppola has sought to imbue a story about tough teen-agers with the rhapsodic passion of opera, the sharp contrasts of German Expressionism, the angst of existentialism and the imagery of Dada. That he can accomplish part of this is a measure of this director’s still-enormous talent. That he would choose to is a sign of how very paradoxical, even aimless, Mr. Coppola’s work has become.
(photo via The Selvedge Yard)

Mickey Rourke as Motorcycle Boy, from Francis Ford Coppola’s 1983 adaptation of S.E. Hinton’s Rumble Fish.

Of the film, Janet Maslin had the following to say in her October 7, 1983 review for The New York Times:

Adapting another of S. E. Hinton’s novels, Mr. Coppola has sought to imbue a story about tough teen-agers with the rhapsodic passion of opera, the sharp contrasts of German Expressionism, the angst of existentialism and the imagery of Dada. That he can accomplish part of this is a measure of this director’s still-enormous talent. That he would choose to is a sign of how very paradoxical, even aimless, Mr. Coppola’s work has become.

(photo via The Selvedge Yard)

John Cazale’s straight flush

If there’s one conversation I never grow tired of having, it’s the one about John Cazale’s cinematic straight flush. He acted in only five films under the direction of only three directors in his short career, before succumbing to cancer at age 42. His films were among the greatest made in what is easily my favorite decade of American cinema: The Godfather (Francis Ford Coppola, 1972), The Conversation (Coppola, 1974), The Godfather Part II (Coppola, 1974), Dog Day Afternoon (Sidney Lumet, 1975) and The Deer Hunter (Michael Cimino, 1978). All five were nominated for Best Picture Oscars, with The Godfather, The Godfather Part II and The Deer Hunter taking home the trophies. Though he starred in none of these films, he played a pivotal role in each.

Much has been said about him, but due to the short filmography, there are still so many questions left lurking in the minds of film lovers. Those are starting to get answered, as there was a great piece written about him in New York Magazine last year and I’ve just heard that Oscilloscope Laboratories just procured the rights to a new documentary directed by Richard Shepard called I Knew It Was You: Rediscovering John Cazale (2010). Keep your eyes peeled for that as it hits art houses near you in the near future.