Bob Rafelson & Jack Nicholson, on the set of Five Easy Pieces (1970)

Bob Rafelson & Jack Nicholson, on the set of Five Easy Pieces (1970)

The universe [occupied by the characters in Two-Lane Blacktop] is one that’s familiar in recent American films like Bonnie and Clyde, Easy Rider and Five Easy Pieces. It consists of the miscellaneous establishments thrown up along the sides of the road to support life: motels, gas stations, hamburger stands. The road itself has a real identity in Two-Lane Blacktop, as if it were a place to live and not just a way to move. There may be homes and gardens hidden behind those interstate terraces, but for the four people in this movie — the road, as the saying goes, is home.
— Roger Ebert, in his 1971 review of Monte Hellman’s classic

The universe [occupied by the characters in Two-Lane Blacktopis one that’s familiar in recent American films like Bonnie and ClydeEasy Rider and Five Easy Pieces. It consists of the miscellaneous establishments thrown up along the sides of the road to support life: motels, gas stations, hamburger stands. The road itself has a real identity in Two-Lane Blacktop, as if it were a place to live and not just a way to move. There may be homes and gardens hidden behind those interstate terraces, but for the four people in this movie — the road, as the saying goes, is home.

— Roger Ebert, in his 1971 review of Monte Hellman’s classic

Classic scene from one of my Top Ten Favorite Films, Five Easy Pieces (1970). It’s the greatest of director Bob Rafelson’s films, and the first in his threepeat (I consider the hallmark of every great filmmaker to be the ability to make three truly great films in a row) — which also included The King of Marvin Gardens (1972) and Stay Hungry (1976).  Read Roger Ebert’s review from 1970. 

Classic scene from one of my Top Ten Favorite Films, Five Easy Pieces (1970). It’s the greatest of director Bob Rafelson’s films, and the first in his threepeat (I consider the hallmark of every great filmmaker to be the ability to make three truly great films in a row) — which also included The King of Marvin Gardens (1972) and Stay Hungry (1976).  Read Roger Ebert’s review from 1970. 

(Source: putablueribbononmybrain, via hoppernicholson)