Watching Rip Torn play the Hank Williams Jr.-esque minor country star Maury Dann in Daryl Duke’s Payday (1973) was bittersweet. It showed me what he might have been had this film not been buried. Jeremy Smith (writing for Chud) pretty much nailed it when he wrote:
If Payday has a reputation, it’s as the movie that should’ve established Torn as one of his generation’s best actors. But the picture - the debut production for Saul Zaentz’s Fantasy Films - never received a wide release, and has since been buried due to a lack of availability and the fact that Torn subsequently went the character actor route. Watching the actor bare-knuckle his way through Payday is to wonder what might’ve been. Though his own erratic behavior probably would’ve kept him from a steady run as a leading man (please Google “Rip Torn” and “Norman Mailer”), there’s no doubt that he was the genuine article - a wilder, scarier, more unpredictable Jack Nicholson. As many have noted, Torn was a man seemingly consumed with violence; when he erupts onscreen, you’re witness to a temporary exorcising of personal demons. He touches depths to which few actors are privy.
Not only was the acting superb, but the direction was impressive as well. It was loose, bare-knuckled and surprisingly enlightening in every way a great ’70s American film ought to be. That it’s taken me so long to find this film is a disappointment. Not only could Rip Torn’s career had gone an entirely different direction had this film been seen, but the former television director Daryl Duke’s could have as well. Rather than going on to do primarily exploitation drive-in fare for the rest of the ’70s and then television epics (The Thorn Birds and Tai-Pan, for instance), he maybe could have had a run at making the sort of films that Hal Ashby, Bob Rafelson and Mike Nichols made for a decade. Instead, his career feels akin to the great-but-underutilized Monte Hellman, whose existential westerns (Ride in the Whirlwind, The Shooting) and cult classics Two-Lane Blacktop and Cockfighter show what might have been had he found producers who believed in him and knew how to sell his work.

Watching Rip Torn play the Hank Williams Jr.-esque minor country star Maury Dann in Daryl Duke’s Payday (1973) was bittersweet. It showed me what he might have been had this film not been buried. Jeremy Smith (writing for Chud) pretty much nailed it when he wrote:

If Payday has a reputation, it’s as the movie that should’ve established Torn as one of his generation’s best actors. But the picture - the debut production for Saul Zaentz’s Fantasy Films - never received a wide release, and has since been buried due to a lack of availability and the fact that Torn subsequently went the character actor route. Watching the actor bare-knuckle his way through Payday is to wonder what might’ve been. Though his own erratic behavior probably would’ve kept him from a steady run as a leading man (please Google “Rip Torn” and “Norman Mailer”), there’s no doubt that he was the genuine article - a wilder, scarier, more unpredictable Jack Nicholson. As many have noted, Torn was a man seemingly consumed with violence; when he erupts onscreen, you’re witness to a temporary exorcising of personal demons. He touches depths to which few actors are privy.

Not only was the acting superb, but the direction was impressive as well. It was loose, bare-knuckled and surprisingly enlightening in every way a great ’70s American film ought to be. That it’s taken me so long to find this film is a disappointment. Not only could Rip Torn’s career had gone an entirely different direction had this film been seen, but the former television director Daryl Duke’s could have as well. Rather than going on to do primarily exploitation drive-in fare for the rest of the ’70s and then television epics (The Thorn Birds and Tai-Pan, for instance), he maybe could have had a run at making the sort of films that Hal Ashby, Bob Rafelson and Mike Nichols made for a decade. Instead, his career feels akin to the great-but-underutilized Monte Hellman, whose existential westerns (Ride in the Whirlwind, The Shooting) and cult classics Two-Lane Blacktop and Cockfighter show what might have been had he found producers who believed in him and knew how to sell his work.

Luke Wilson
(via notarobotbutaghost)

Luke Wilson

(via notarobotbutaghost)

Tags: Film

Julia Ormond’s ’90s beat your ’90s.

Julia Ormond’s ’90s beat your ’90s.

Tags: Film

 
I always wanted to spend my twilight years being regarded as a grizzled embittered curmudgeonly old bastard, but instead it’s all goddam lifetime achievement awards and the French adding me to their Legion of Honour. Have none of these assholes seen ‘Paint Your Wagon’ or ‘Space Cowboys’? I used to co-star with an orangutan for Christ’s sake!
— Clint Eastwood
(text via notarobotbutaghost)

I always wanted to spend my twilight years being regarded as a grizzled embittered curmudgeonly old bastard, but instead it’s all goddam lifetime achievement awards and the French adding me to their Legion of Honour. Have none of these assholes seen ‘Paint Your Wagon’ or ‘Space Cowboys’? I used to co-star with an orangutan for Christ’s sake!

— Clint Eastwood

(text via notarobotbutaghost)

 
"Hey Dennis. Hey Dennis. Hey Dennis, man. Hey Dennis. I’m going to fuck your wife.”

"Hey Dennis. Hey Dennis. Hey Dennis, man. Hey Dennis. I’m going to fuck your wife.”

Kate Beckinsale

Kate Beckinsale

I’m trying to find ways to show violence as it really is: it is not something that you can swallow. I want to show the reality of violence, the pain, the wounding of another human being.
— Michael Haneke
(text via hannahfidell)

I’m trying to find ways to show violence as it really is: it is not something that you can swallow. I want to show the reality of violence, the pain, the wounding of another human being.

— Michael Haneke

(text via hannahfidell)

Tags: Film

Bill Murray and Gilda Radner, dancing together at Studio 54’s 1978 Valentine’s Day ball.

Bill Murray and Gilda Radner, dancing together at Studio 54’s 1978 Valentine’s Day ball.

(Source: vanityfair, via notarobotbutaghost)

Werner Herzog , on the set of Fitzcarraldo (1981)

Werner Herzog , on the set of Fitzcarraldo (1981)

(via neoretro)

 A Haunting ‘Conversation’ (an excerpt)by Vincent Canby, 1974 
Have you considered the possibility that everything that’s ever been said in this world might still be echoing somewhere, maybe rattling around within the interior of a stone, a tree trunk or at the bottom of the sea?
Though becoming increasingly faint, the sounds shall never disappear entirely and one day, perhaps, there will be equipment Sensitive enough to retrieve and record mankind’s oral history. In 24 abridged volumes it would make a perfect introductory offer to a book club.
Or even a book club all of its own.

 A Haunting ‘Conversation’ (an excerpt)
by Vincent Canby, 1974 

Have you considered the possibility that
everything that’s ever been said in this world
might still be echoing somewhere,
maybe rattling around within
the interior of a stone, a tree trunk
or at the bottom of the sea?

Though becoming increasingly faint,
the sounds shall never disappear
entirely and one day, perhaps,
there will be equipment Sensitive enough
to retrieve and record mankind’s oral history.
In 24 abridged volumes it would make
a perfect introductory offer to a book club.

Or even a book club all of its own.

(via hannahfidell)

Before he directed The Shining and A Clockwork Orange, Stanley Kubrick was a photojournalist. See his best photos here!

Stanley Kubrick as a Photojournalist in Chicago

Before he directed The Shining and A Clockwork Orange, Stanley Kubrick was a photojournalist. See his best photos here!

Stanley Kubrick as a Photojournalist in Chicago

(via neoretro)

"Mr. Cassavetes is unquestionably sympathetic to the rootless state of the middle-American housewife."
— Nora Sayre, in her Oct 14, 1974 review of A Woman Under the Influence for the New York Times

"Mr. Cassavetes is unquestionably sympathetic to the rootless state of the middle-American housewife."

— Nora Sayre, in her Oct 14, 1974 review of A Woman Under the Influence for the New York Times

Wim Wenders, ”The Coppolas”

Wim Wenders, ”The Coppolas”

Jessica Biel

Jessica Biel

(Source: votebowieforpresident)

Tags: Film