The deification began with Julian Barry’s play, adapted for Bob Fosse’s Lenny, and continued with Albert Goldman’s book Ladies and Gentlemen, Lenny Bruce!! and the Lenny Bruce Performance Film. His albums are back in the record stores and, all things considered, [Lenny Bruce] is still one of our most successful comedians.All of this myth-making involves playing fast and loose with the facts, which do not make Lenny Bruce out as quite the heroic figure we’re now asked to accept. But no matter. If the film Lenny works as fiction, that’s all we have the right to expect. The problem is that it doesn’t. Bob Fosse, who captured a time and form of show business so memorably in Cabaret, tries this time for a quasi-documentary style that gets in the way of his, and Lenny’s, material. And Dustin Hoffman, good as he is in the title role, is never quite permitted to put together an organic, three-dimensional character.
— Roger Ebert, from his November 10, 1974 review of Lenny
(image via fuckyeahmovieposters)

The deification began with Julian Barry’s play, adapted for Bob Fosse’s Lenny, and continued with Albert Goldman’s book Ladies and Gentlemen, Lenny Bruce!! and the Lenny Bruce Performance Film. His albums are back in the record stores and, all things considered, [Lenny Bruce] is still one of our most successful comedians.

All of this myth-making involves playing fast and loose with the facts, which do not make Lenny Bruce out as quite the heroic figure we’re now asked to accept. But no matter. If the film Lenny works as fiction, that’s all we have the right to expect. The problem is that it doesn’t. Bob Fosse, who captured a time and form of show business so memorably in Cabaret, tries this time for a quasi-documentary style that gets in the way of his, and Lenny’s, material. And Dustin Hoffman, good as he is in the title role, is never quite permitted to put together an organic, three-dimensional character.

Roger Ebert, from his November 10, 1974 review of Lenny

(image via fuckyeahmovieposters)

I love a good dirty cop flick, even of the mere three-star variety. The The Son of No One (2011) trailer appears like it’ll do the trick.
(image via fuckyeahmovieposters)

I love a good dirty cop flick, even of the mere three-star variety. The The Son of No One (2011) trailer appears like it’ll do the trick.

(image via fuckyeahmovieposters)

…Love scores an altogether unreasonable triumph over common sense in Minnie and Moskowitz, the new comedy by John Cassavetes. The movie is sort of a fairy tale, Cassavetes says; it’s dedicated to all the people who didn’t marry the person they should have. It is a movie on the side of love, and it is one of the finest movies of the year.
— Roger Ebert, in his February 14, 1972 review of Minnie and Moskowitz (1972)

…Love scores an altogether unreasonable triumph over common sense in Minnie and Moskowitz, the new comedy by John Cassavetes. The movie is sort of a fairy tale, Cassavetes says; it’s dedicated to all the people who didn’t marry the person they should have. It is a movie on the side of love, and it is one of the finest movies of the year.

— Roger Ebert, in his February 14, 1972 review of Minnie and Moskowitz (1972)

Jim Jarmusch’s Stranger Than Paradise looks as if it had been left on the windowsill too long. Shot in 16- millimeter black-and-white, and now blown up to 35 millimeter, its images appear to have been aged by the sun and by general neglect until they’ve faded into a uniform shade of gray. When, occasionally, there’s a splotch of comparatively pure black or white, the effect is disorienting until you recognize what Mr. Jarmusch is up to - that is, discovering the ludicrously sublime in the supremely tacky. The film, a prize-winner at this year’s Cannes festival, is something quite special.
— Vincent Canby, in his Sept. 29, 1984 New York Times review
(image via fuckyeahmovieposters)

Jim Jarmusch’s Stranger Than Paradise looks as if it had been left on the windowsill too long. Shot in 16- millimeter black-and-white, and now blown up to 35 millimeter, its images appear to have been aged by the sun and by general neglect until they’ve faded into a uniform shade of gray. When, occasionally, there’s a splotch of comparatively pure black or white, the effect is disorienting until you recognize what Mr. Jarmusch is up to - that is, discovering the ludicrously sublime in the supremely tacky. The film, a prize-winner at this year’s Cannes festival, is something quite special.

— Vincent Canby, in his Sept. 29, 1984 New York Times review

(image via fuckyeahmovieposters)

Annie Hall contains more intellectual wit and cultural references than any other movie ever to win the Oscar for best picture, and in winning the award in 1977 it edged out Star Wars, an outcome unthinkable today. The victory marked the beginning of Woody Allen’s career as an important filmmaker (his earlier work was funny but slight) and it signaled the end of the 1970s golden age of American movies. With Star Wars, the age of the blockbuster was upon us, and movies this quirky and idiosyncratic would find themselves shouldered aside by Hollywood’s greed for mega-hits. Annie Hall grossed about $40 million—less than any other modern best picture winner, and less than the budgets of many of them.
— Rober Ebert
(image via fuckyeahmovieposters)

Annie Hall contains more intellectual wit and cultural references than any other movie ever to win the Oscar for best picture, and in winning the award in 1977 it edged out Star Wars, an outcome unthinkable today. The victory marked the beginning of Woody Allen’s career as an important filmmaker (his earlier work was funny but slight) and it signaled the end of the 1970s golden age of American movies. With Star Wars, the age of the blockbuster was upon us, and movies this quirky and idiosyncratic would find themselves shouldered aside by Hollywood’s greed for mega-hits. Annie Hall grossed about $40 million—less than any other modern best picture winner, and less than the budgets of many of them.

Rober Ebert

(image via fuckyeahmovieposters)

One of the scarier films from my early childhood, Poltergeist (1982), finds producer Steven Spielberg revisiting the suburbs with director Tobe Hooper. It’s the best film Hooper had done since Texas Chainsaw Massacre (1974), which is both a Top 10 Film of All-Time for me as well as my favorite horror film. Poltergeist ranks up there with The Changeling (1980) and The Amityville Horror (1979) as some of the most effecting ghost stories of my childhood.
Funny, though, how much gore and fright they got out of a PG-rated film — especially considering it was released in ‘82. The PG-13 rating wasn’t adopted until a few years later. 
Wikipedia on the adoption of the PG-13 rating:In 1984, explicit violence and gore in the films Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom and Gremlins caused an uproar among parents over their PG rating. Their complaints led Hollywood figure Steven Spielberg, director of Temple of Doom and producer of Gremlins, to suggest a new rating to MPAA president Jack Valenti. Spielberg’s suggestion was for an intermediate rating of PG-13 or PG-14. On conferring with cinema owners, Valenti and the MPAA on July 1, 1984, introduced the PG-13 rating indicating that some material may be inappropriate for children under 13. The first film distributed with a PG-13 rating was Red Dawn (1984).
(image via fuckyeahmovieposters)

One of the scarier films from my early childhood, Poltergeist (1982), finds producer Steven Spielberg revisiting the suburbs with director Tobe Hooper. It’s the best film Hooper had done since Texas Chainsaw Massacre (1974), which is both a Top 10 Film of All-Time for me as well as my favorite horror film. Poltergeist ranks up there with The Changeling (1980) and The Amityville Horror (1979) as some of the most effecting ghost stories of my childhood.

Funny, though, how much gore and fright they got out of a PG-rated film — especially considering it was released in ‘82. The PG-13 rating wasn’t adopted until a few years later. 

Wikipedia on the adoption of the PG-13 rating:
In 1984, explicit violence and gore in the films Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom and Gremlins caused an uproar among parents over their PG rating. Their complaints led Hollywood figure Steven Spielberg, director of Temple of Doom and producer of Gremlins, to suggest a new rating to MPAA president Jack Valenti. Spielberg’s suggestion was for an intermediate rating of PG-13 or PG-14. On conferring with cinema owners, Valenti and the MPAA on July 1, 1984, introduced the PG-13 rating indicating that some material may be inappropriate for children under 13. The first film distributed with a PG-13 rating was Red Dawn (1984).

(image via fuckyeahmovieposters)

Three quite different posters for The Long Goodbye (1973), one of my favorite Robert Altman films.

(image via salesonfilm)

Three quite different posters for The Long Goodbye (1973), one of my favorite Robert Altman films.

(image via salesonfilm)

There’s no other American director who can do what John Cassavetes does on the screen. There may not be many who would want to. Mr. Cassavetes’s work, in Love Streams, as in his earlier films, is as overflowing with emotional constructs as it is barren of other forms of thought. It’s excessive and idiosyncratic all the way. Yet Mr. Cassavetes, as both actor and director, is never without his own peculiar magnetism and authority. Once again, he is able to galvanize a long, rambling, quirky psychodrama through sheer force of personality. 
— Janet Maslin for New York Times, in her August 24, 1984 review of Cassavetes’ last great film

There’s no other American director who can do what John Cassavetes does on the screen. There may not be many who would want to. Mr. Cassavetes’s work, in Love Streams, as in his earlier films, is as overflowing with emotional constructs as it is barren of other forms of thought. It’s excessive and idiosyncratic all the way. Yet Mr. Cassavetes, as both actor and director, is never without his own peculiar magnetism and authority. Once again, he is able to galvanize a long, rambling, quirky psychodrama through sheer force of personality. 

— Janet Maslin for New York Times, in her August 24, 1984 review of Cassavetes’ last great film

I’m due to revisit Sergio Leone’s beautiful Once Upon a Time in the West. Growing up this felt like the most violent and gritty of his spaghetti westerns with name Hollywood stars (this one starring Henry Fonda, Jason Robards and Charles Bronson).
(image via fuckyeahmovieposters)

I’m due to revisit Sergio Leone’s beautiful Once Upon a Time in the West. Growing up this felt like the most violent and gritty of his spaghetti westerns with name Hollywood stars (this one starring Henry Fonda, Jason Robards and Charles Bronson).

(image via fuckyeahmovieposters)

Pauline Kael’s renowned review of Bertolucci’s Last Tango in Paris for The New Yorker on October 28, 1972.
(image via fuckyeahmovieposters)

Pauline Kael’s renowned review of Bertolucci’s Last Tango in Paris for The New Yorker on October 28, 1972.

(image via fuckyeahmovieposters)

Like a Time Machine Powered by Bicycles wrote a nice piece on this release of John Cassavetes’ Faces soundtrack.

Like a Time Machine Powered by Bicycles wrote a nice piece on this release of John Cassavetes’ Faces soundtrack.

One of the greats. His second feature, it is easily Peter Boddanovich’s best. Though Paper Moon (1973) and Saint Jack (1979) are both fantastic films, they both feel distinctly minor next to this truly timeless film.
 
The Last Picture Show has been described as an evocation of the classic Hollywood narrative film. It is more than that; it is a belated entry in that age — the best film of 1951, you might say. Using period songs and decor to create nostalgia is familiar enough, but to tunnel down to the visual level and get that right, too, and in a way that will affect audiences even if they aren’t aware how, is one hell of a directing accomplishment. Movies create our dreams as well as reflect them, and when we lose the movies we lose the dreams. I wonder if Bogdanovich’s film doesn’t at last explain what it was that Pauline Kael, and a lot of the rest of us, lost at the movies.
— Roger Ebert in his original review of the film from 1971

One of the greats. His second feature, it is easily Peter Boddanovich’s best. Though Paper Moon (1973) and Saint Jack (1979) are both fantastic films, they both feel distinctly minor next to this truly timeless film.

The Last Picture Show has been described as an evocation of the classic Hollywood narrative film. It is more than that; it is a belated entry in that age — the best film of 1951, you might say. Using period songs and decor to create nostalgia is familiar enough, but to tunnel down to the visual level and get that right, too, and in a way that will affect audiences even if they aren’t aware how, is one hell of a directing accomplishment. Movies create our dreams as well as reflect them, and when we lose the movies we lose the dreams. I wonder if Bogdanovich’s film doesn’t at last explain what it was that Pauline Kael, and a lot of the rest of us, lost at the movies.

Roger Ebert in his original review of the film from 1971

Chelsea Girls poster by Alan Aldridge, 1966. Roger Ebert review from June 26, 1967.
(via anneyhall)

Chelsea Girls poster by Alan Aldridge, 1966. Roger Ebert review from June 26, 1967.

(via anneyhall)