Still of the menacing (and Jorma Whittaker-esque) Andrew Robinson from Don Siegel’s Dirty Harry (1971)

Still of the menacing (and Jorma Whittaker-esque) Andrew Robinson from Don Siegel’s Dirty Harry (1971)

 
I always wanted to spend my twilight years being regarded as a grizzled embittered curmudgeonly old bastard, but instead it’s all goddam lifetime achievement awards and the French adding me to their Legion of Honour. Have none of these assholes seen ‘Paint Your Wagon’ or ‘Space Cowboys’? I used to co-star with an orangutan for Christ’s sake!
— Clint Eastwood
(text via notarobotbutaghost)

I always wanted to spend my twilight years being regarded as a grizzled embittered curmudgeonly old bastard, but instead it’s all goddam lifetime achievement awards and the French adding me to their Legion of Honour. Have none of these assholes seen ‘Paint Your Wagon’ or ‘Space Cowboys’? I used to co-star with an orangutan for Christ’s sake!

— Clint Eastwood

(text via notarobotbutaghost)

(via neoretro)

Clint’s foray into orangutan core was puzzling indeed.

Clint’s foray into orangutan core was puzzling indeed.

(Source: shopireland.ie)

Clyde — co-star of Every Which Way But Loose (1980) and Any Which Way You Can (1983) — to his haters. There are a passionate few, however.

Clyde — co-star of Every Which Way But Loose (1980) and Any Which Way You Can (1983) — to his haters. There are a passionate few, however.

This trade ad appeared in the Nov. 9, 1970 issue of Boxoffice magazine, promoting the then-‘In Production’ Warner Bros. release Dirty Harry, and offers a rare glimpse of Sinatra’s Harry Callahan. Note that at this stage, Kershner was still set to direct. These roles ended up going to Clint Eastwood and Don Siegel, respectively.
(via The Dirtiest)

This trade ad appeared in the Nov. 9, 1970 issue of Boxoffice magazine, promoting the then-‘In Production’ Warner Bros. release Dirty Harry, and offers a rare glimpse of Sinatra’s Harry Callahan. Note that at this stage, Kershner was still set to direct. These roles ended up going to Clint Eastwood and Don Siegel, respectively.

(via The Dirtiest)

I’m fascinated by the convention of celebrities honoring one another’s achievements & passing via paid advertisements (which cost beaucoups bucks) in trade magazines such as Variety, or Billboard (as from this issue from December 18, 1982).
(image via billboardingparty)

I’m fascinated by the convention of celebrities honoring one another’s achievements & passing via paid advertisements (which cost beaucoups bucks) in trade magazines such as Variety, or Billboard (as from this issue from December 18, 1982).

(image via billboardingparty)

Clint Eastwood. 1959.
(via aquariumdrunkard)

Clint Eastwood. 1959.

(via aquariumdrunkard)

Vincent Canby’s New York Times review of Escape from Alcatraz from June 22, 1979.
This was a favorite of mine growing up, as I obsessed over all things Clint Eastwood-related. It was the last good film by director Don Siegel, as was it the last of five films on which he collaborated with Eastwood. These also included Coogan’s Bluff, The Beguiled, Two Mules For Sister Sara and the great Dirty Harry, which ranks among my favorite films of all time.
Speaking of, Roger Ebert had the following to say about Dirty Harry In his 1971 review of the film:
The movie clearly and unmistakably gives us a character who understands the Bill of Rights, understands his legal responsibility as a police officer, and nevertheless takes retribution into his own hands. Sure, Scorpio is portrayed as the most vicious, perverted, warped monster we can imagine — but that’s part of the same stacked deck. The movie’s moral position is fascist. No doubt about it.

Vincent Canby’s New York Times review of Escape from Alcatraz from June 22, 1979.

This was a favorite of mine growing up, as I obsessed over all things Clint Eastwood-related. It was the last good film by director Don Siegel, as was it the last of five films on which he collaborated with Eastwood. These also included Coogan’s Bluff, The Beguiled, Two Mules For Sister Sara and the great Dirty Harry, which ranks among my favorite films of all time.

Speaking of, Roger Ebert had the following to say about Dirty Harry In his 1971 review of the film:

The movie clearly and unmistakably gives us a character who understands the Bill of Rights, understands his legal responsibility as a police officer, and nevertheless takes retribution into his own hands. Sure, Scorpio is portrayed as the most vicious, perverted, warped monster we can imagine — but that’s part of the same stacked deck. The movie’s moral position is fascist. No doubt about it.

Nelson Mandela’s generosity

I’m feeling a little inspired watching Clint Eastwood’s Invictus at the moment. Not soooo inspired that I can’t take my eyes off the film — especially during its by-the-books rugby battle scenes (and I’m usually a sucker for a good sports narrative in film). Moreso, I was so moved early on in the film by Nelson Mandela’s political compassion that, in its light, what would otherwise be perfectly engaging sports scenes are feeling a little underwhelming. The real sport story of Invictus isn’t found on the field but between the newly-freed and elected Mandela and his hungry-for-change supporters, from whom he found himself alienated when he saw a nation-building opportunity in the shape of supporting the national rugby team. Rather than use his new mandate to dismantle what was seen by black South Africans as a symbol of antiquated and still painful Apartheid-era white hegemony, he chose instead to risk his hard won political capital to support the white Afrikaner-cherished tradition. In a very moving scene, Mandela (played deftly by the always great Morgan Freeman) gives the following speech to his party, who’d gathered to vote on shutting down the rugby program.

"On Robben Island in Pollsmoor Prison, all of my jailers were Afrikaners. For 27 years I studied them. I learned their language. Read their books. Their poetry. I had to know my enemy before I could prevail against them. And we did prevail, did we not? All of us here, we prevailed. Our enemy is no longer the Afrikaner. They are our fellow South Africans, our partners in a democracy. And they treasure Springbok rugby. If we take that away, we lose them. We prove that we are what they feared we would be. We have to be better than that. We have to surprise them with the compassion, with restraint and generosity. I know all of the things they denied us. But this is no time to celebrate petty revenge. This is the time to build our nation using every single brick available to us. Even if that brick comes wrapped in green and gold."

While it didn’t make much green at the box office (making a disappointing $37.5 million in theaters), that’s surely the stuff of biopic gold (you can practically hear the producers clinking their champagne glasses in the background during the pregnant pause after that speech is delivered) and the stuff Eastwood was born to deliver in a blaze of John Huston-esque glory. Is it safe? You bet. Has it been done before? You bet. Does it have guts? Well, the story does, but not so sure about the storytelling. Does it matter? No way. Sometimes you just feel like a Snickers, and this shit is inspiring. At the very least I’m feeling compelled to do some reading on Mandela to go beyond my anecdotal understanding of who he was as a man.