Bad Timing (1980)

Bad Timing (1980)

 
Coming as it does after Nichols’s Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?, The Graduate, and Catch-22, there is a danger, I’m afraid, that Carnal Knowledge will be found disappointing by those who feel that a man’s movies must be increasingly elaborate and long-focused if it’s to be said that his career is progressing. This is just a variation on the old Hollywood myth to the effect that unless each succeeding film of an individual director is more expensive, and a bigger box-office success than the one before, the director must be on his way to Skid Row, or even retirement in Santa Monica.
Carnal Knowledge is nothing if not short-focused. Indeed, it’s virtually a two-character film that devotes itself—with an exclusivity that is rare outside stag films, television commercials, and Japanese haiku—to a single subject: the sexual disasters of Jonathan (Jack Nicholson) and Sandy (Art Garfunkel), initially met when they are Amherst undergraduates in the 1940’s, and finally abandoned as they enter bleak middle-age in the 1970’s.
— Bosley Crowther, from his July 1, 1971 New York Times review

Coming as it does after Nichols’s Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?, The Graduate, and Catch-22, there is a danger, I’m afraid, that Carnal Knowledge will be found disappointing by those who feel that a man’s movies must be increasingly elaborate and long-focused if it’s to be said that his career is progressing. This is just a variation on the old Hollywood myth to the effect that unless each succeeding film of an individual director is more expensive, and a bigger box-office success than the one before, the director must be on his way to Skid Row, or even retirement in Santa Monica.

Carnal Knowledge is nothing if not short-focused. Indeed, it’s virtually a two-character film that devotes itself—with an exclusivity that is rare outside stag films, television commercials, and Japanese haiku—to a single subject: the sexual disasters of Jonathan (Jack Nicholson) and Sandy (Art Garfunkel), initially met when they are Amherst undergraduates in the 1940’s, and finally abandoned as they enter bleak middle-age in the 1970’s.

— Bosley Crowther, from his July 1, 1971 New York Times review

Director Mike Nichols enjoyed a fourpeat of truly great & challenging films in the late ’60s, with Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? (1966), The Graduate (1967), Catch-22 (1970) and Carnal Knowledge (1971). The latter two starred Art Garfunkel, fresh off his break-up with Paul Simon. His performances were so shockingly sublime that it’s a real disappointment that he did not do more acting in feature films during this golden age of American film. His next role wasn’t until 1980 when he starred in Nicolas Roeg’s highly erotic Bad Timing.
Photo of Mike Nichols on the set of The Graduate by Bob Willoughby.
(photo via anneyhall)

Director Mike Nichols enjoyed a fourpeat of truly great & challenging films in the late ’60s, with Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? (1966), The Graduate (1967), Catch-22 (1970) and Carnal Knowledge (1971). The latter two starred Art Garfunkel, fresh off his break-up with Paul Simon. His performances were so shockingly sublime that it’s a real disappointment that he did not do more acting in feature films during this golden age of American film. His next role wasn’t until 1980 when he starred in Nicolas Roeg’s highly erotic Bad Timing.

Photo of Mike Nichols on the set of The Graduate by Bob Willoughby.

(photo via anneyhall)

myfamilyalbum:

David Bowie, Art Garfunkel, Paul Simon, Yoko Ono, and John Lennon, Grammys 1975

Conscious party.

myfamilyalbum:

David Bowie, Art Garfunkel, Paul Simon, Yoko Ono, and John Lennon, Grammys 1975

Conscious party.