Watching Warren Oates’ white suit get increasingly more dirty & foul throughout this hungover two-hour revelation is one of the most trying-yet-truly-revelatory passages of Peckinpah’s demanding career. I watch it every few years and have not found it any easier to get through over time. Roger Ebert astutely pointed out, “I think I can feel Sam Peckinpah’s heart beating and head pounding in every frame in Bring Me the Head of Alfredo Garcia (1974), a film he made during a period of alcoholic fear and trembling.”

Watching Warren Oates’ white suit get increasingly more dirty & foul throughout this hungover two-hour revelation is one of the most trying-yet-truly-revelatory passages of Peckinpah’s demanding career. I watch it every few years and have not found it any easier to get through over time. Roger Ebert astutely pointed out, “I think I can feel Sam Peckinpah’s heart beating and head pounding in every frame in Bring Me the Head of Alfredo Garcia (1974), a film he made during a period of alcoholic fear and trembling.”