1970 – ’71 was definitely a high-water mark for Film Director (not to mention a badass photographer to boot) Robert Altman.  Hot on the heels of M*A*S*H (1970), McCabe and Mrs. Miller (1971) was released and became, what many consider to be, one of Warren Beatty’s finest roles, and one of the best Westerns (or anti-Western, if you will) ever made according to many film aficionados… There was a definite charged energy on the set (shot completely in B.C.) – the reported tension between the egomaniac Beatty and the chill Altman – not to mention the sexual energy between Beatty and [Julie] Christie, who were deep in the throes of a passionate love affair – is there any other kind of affair with Beatty? Then there’s the haunting film soundtrack including the legendary Leonard Cohen that accompanied [cinematographer Vilmos] Zsigmond’s “flashed” film negative. A truly ballsy move – Altman and Zsigmond shot the film “pre-fogged” through a number of filters to maintain the visual effect they wanted, rather than manipulate it in post-production. That ensured that studio wimps couldn’t later tune-down the film’s look to something more safe and conventional. Vilmos Zsigmond’s brilliant work would garner him a nomination by the British Academy Film Awards.
— via The Selvedge Yard

1970 – ’71 was definitely a high-water mark for Film Director (not to mention a badass photographer to boot) Robert Altman.  Hot on the heels of M*A*S*H (1970), McCabe and Mrs. Miller (1971) was released and became, what many consider to be, one of Warren Beatty’s finest roles, and one of the best Westerns (or anti-Western, if you will) ever made according to many film aficionados… There was a definite charged energy on the set (shot completely in B.C.) – the reported tension between the egomaniac Beatty and the chill Altman – not to mention the sexual energy between Beatty and [Julie] Christie, who were deep in the throes of a passionate love affair – is there any other kind of affair with Beatty? Then there’s the haunting film soundtrack including the legendary Leonard Cohen that accompanied [cinematographer Vilmos] Zsigmond’s “flashed” film negative. A truly ballsy move – Altman and Zsigmond shot the film “pre-fogged” through a number of filters to maintain the visual effect they wanted, rather than manipulate it in post-production. That ensured that studio wimps couldn’t later tune-down the film’s look to something more safe and conventional. Vilmos Zsigmond’s brilliant work would garner him a nomination by the British Academy Film Awards.

— via The Selvedge Yard